About your Search

20120901
20120930
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
of muammar gadhafi. someone fired a rocket into the u.s. consulate in benghazi during a chaotic protest. we're going to join cnn joeman. she's with us. tell us about this attention that erupted in benghazi. it did not actually happen in tripoli. are you in tripoli. how are people responding to what has taken place? >> well, the situation here in tripoli does seem to be normal. people are on the streets. there seems to be nothing but the news that -- of what happened in bengazy spreading across tripoli today. most of the people i have token to, people in the capital here, are shocked and saddened by this attack. they say that it does not reflect the way libyans treat their guests. this is not the way libyans feel about the united states, and they do appreciate and do express gratitude for the rule the united states played last year as part of the nato alliance in helping the libyan people in ousting mow har gadhafi during their revolution. we are hearing also from government officials who are condemning this. they're also promising to bring those responsible to justice to have an investigati
are in custody in benghazi. they're being indirectly linked to the rocket attack on the u.s. consulate. i want to talk to jimana in tripoli, the libyan capital west of benghazi. first of all, what do we know about those arrested? >> very little, suzanne, so far. what we understand from libyan officials is that at least one of those arrested is a -- they were detained in benghazi yesterday. we know they are being interrogated to see what role they had in the attack, but according to one sore libyan official today, they may not have been directly linked to the attack. they may have ties to the extremist organization that carried out the attack. they have not been charged yet. they are detained and being intrargted acorked to libyan officials, so we should be knowing about this as information is released by the libyan government. >> do we believe these people are really responsible for what took place, or does this look like this is more kind of a show? >> well, quite frankly, suzanne, the libyan government here is under a lot of pressure when it comes to this. not only from the united states, bu
group led the hours long siege in benghazi, libya. the militants were apparently enraged by a cheaply made online film considered offensive to islam. just last hour one libyan leader joined the international chorus in condemning the tack. >> translator: we apologize to the u.s. and to the american people, to the government and also to the rest of the world for what happened yesterday. and at the same time, we expect the world to cooperate with us in order to confront to what is meant out of this kind of cowardice, criminal act. >> that is the libyan ambassador -- i'm sorry, libyan prime minister. cnn foreign aaffairs reporter elise labott is at the state department. you've known ambassador christopher for years. tell us about him. >> carol, what can i say? he was considered, really, at the state department the cream of the crop in terms of diplomatic foreign service officers. this was not a -- we're seeing him in a pinstripe suit right there. he's not really what you consider a pinstripe diplomat, sitting in his office. he was out in the field, working with all sectors of libyan socie
in benghazi, and were waitinged for an opportunity to strike. that opportunity came in a street riot last night. here's secretary of state hillary clinton today. >> he risked his life to stop a tyrant, then gave his life trying to help build a better libya. live at the state department now to ellise. first of all, to the new information we are getting here because this is very rare. we understand for an ambassador to be killed by terrorists. does it change how people feel about what has happened at the state department that people's dear friend and colleague that he was not targeted, but this was something of a tragic accident? >> suzanne, i think the halls of the state department really are mourning right now everybody. chris stevens was someone that was well known to everybody. effects one of the most pop lash -- popular people of the foreign service. if you hear about one random person -- not to make light of their death, but one random person killed in a rocket attack, but this was someone that everyone in the state department knew. he was a very public figure, and right now everybody
of those that were killed in benghazi, libya. president clinton will be delivering brief remarks. we're told that the first lady will be at that ceremony. this is supposed to happen about 2:15 this afternoon at andrew's air force base. let's go to tunisia. no north africa protesters have breached the u.s. embassy, the capital in tunisia. our journalist is joining us from tunisia, and i understand we lost that connection. we're going to get back to him and go on to another story, and many of the protests. what we are seeing here. we mention this -- this is the black flag. this is being carried by people in the crowd representing islam. it is called the shahada, the first pillar of islam, written in white letters. it says, quote, "there is no god but allah and muhammad is his messenger." it is an affirmation of faith. we want to bring in the crowds of angry egyptians are fighting with police in cairo right now. their anger aimed in part at the united states. you see those pictures. those people are climbing the walls for four days around the american embassy many tahrir square. you hav
.s. consulate in benghazi was a preplanned coordinated attack carried out by islamist radical groups, militants operating in the eastern part of the country, the big question is what will the libyan government do next. we heard strong words of condemnation coming out here. the president of the libyan parliament yesterday saying they will not let people stage attacks against western targets. but the big question is will they actually do anything beyond these words. we have seen attacks in recent months targeting western interests in and around the city of benghazi, but little was done to bring the perpetrators of these attacks to justice, although the government now is vowing that they will bring those responsible for tuesday's attack to justice. but the government does know who these groups are, they're aware of their presence in and around the city of benghazi. these are groups that are linked to al qaeda. these are extremist militant groups that are known to have bases around in the eastern part of the country. there will be no doubt a lot of pressure from the united states on libyan authorit
on the embassy. within hours, crowds gathered outside benghazi, libya. armed militants killed the u.s. ambassador and three of the staffers. today, crowds storm the u.s. embassy in yemen. riot police eventually turned them back with tear gas. also today, demonstrators turn out in iran. they aamass outside the swiss embassy, which represents u.s. interests in iran. let's get the latest now from that region. mohammed jamjoon join us. >> about 2,000 to 3,000 protesters that were marching toward the u.s. embassy, many of them aable to get close enough to the main gates. they started scaling the walls. fires were set outside the u.s. embassy compound. i've spoken to a western diplomat there who tells me everyone in the embassy is fine. no word if the staff has been evacuated. just a short while ago, yemeni president issued a statement in which he issued an apology to u.s. president barack obama and the american people for the attack on the embassy today, saying this was unacceptable and ordered yemeni security forces to launch an investigation and prosecute anybody they found involved in this to the f
, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution arriving on a cargo ship. as america's representative, he helped the libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for the future in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. and after the revolution he supported the birth of a new democracy as libyans held elections and built new institutions and began to move forward after decades of li dictatorship. chris stevens loved his work. he took pride in the country he served, and he saw dignity in the people that he met. and two weeks ago he traveled to benghazi to review plans to establish a new cultural center and modernize a hospital. that's when america's compound came under attack. along with three of his colleagues, chris was killed in the city he helped to save. he was 52 years old. i tell you this story because chris stevens embodied the best of america. like his fellow foreign service officers, he built bridges across oceans and cultures and was deeply invested in the international
.s. consulate in benghazi in june. i want to bring in our cnn national security analyst, peter bergen, who has reported extensively on al qaeda as well as interviewing sbeosama bin la back in '97. i talked to peter earlier and he explained how the u.s. first learned about this al qaeda group in libya. >> reporter: in 2007, the u.s. military recovered a trove of documents in iraq, basically the sort of rosetta stone of al qaeda in iraq. and when they looked at these documents and analyzed them, they found that 40% of the foreign fighters coming into iraq were coming from libya, which was kind of an unexpected thing to find. and so historically, libya has provided quite a lot of suicide attackers to al qaeda and the group that is sort of deemed to be behind this attack is probably one of these sort of splinter groups from al qaeda central. >> how strong is their presence there in libya, and who leads them? do we know? >> reporter: you know, i mean there is sort of umbrella group, according to the former libyan jihadist called ansar al sharia. i think a lot of this is relatively secretive. this i
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)